Interview with Chad Falkenberg and Kelly Reynolds from Falken Reynolds

Portrait by The Collective You

Can you tell us about your recent storefront window installation collaboration with Bocci and Inform Interiors? Can you describe the concept behind the two distinct designs you created? We have been fans of Bocci since our studios both began a decade ago and we continue to use Bocci lighting extensively in our private home projects. We jumped when they asked us to collaborate on a more public installation. And while this is our third window installation for our friends at Inform Interiors, this is the first time we had the  immense full span of the their 50 Water Street storefront as a stage.

The concept is our visual snapshot of this moment in history and the pandemic. It has two parts: conveniently separated by the store entrance, one side is sombre and meditative, a reflection on the intense year we have all been through. The other side of the entrance is an explosion of colour, hopeful about getting past pandemic restrictions when we can be with the people we love and throw a party!

You’re working on a residential beach house project in Victoria with Point Break Developments. What has been the inspiration for the design? This house has an incredible connection to the beach and has a strong relationship to the site and to Canada – it is quiet and unassuming, with low linear architecture by Chris Foyd that actually looks like a bungalow from the approach. We developed the interior as a response to both the site and the architecture.

The client wanted a minimalist house with a refined approach so it is both robust and welcoming, like the modern work of British designer, John Pawson and many contemporary Belgian designers. We took inspiration from the subtle colours of the sand and driftwood on the beach just outside, as well as the contrasts of the coastal waters.

As the design developed, it became about eliminating distractions – there is no tile or grout in the entire house to avoid any unnecessary lines (or crevices to scrub). Jason Good Custom Cabinets and Canadian Bavarian Lumber worked with us over several months to coordinate the stain and finish of the cedar ceiling and oak millwork so they look like they are the same colour. And when we couldn’t find a light fixture large enough for the kitchen island, Broadwell Metal Company fabricated our custom design.

The client is originally from Edmonton (like I am) and wanted to bring that connection into the home along with sourcing a strong focus on local. We have lighting and furniture from Tomnuk and IZM, both from Edmonton, a solid marble sink and a bush-hammered marble backsplash from Vancouver Island Marble, alongside lighting and plumbing fixtures from Bocci, ANDlight, and Blu Bathworks.

What other projects are you working on that are getting your team inspired? This year we started work on seven new projects with past clients. For one of our clients, it is our seventh project together. They include a surfing compound in Mexico, a vacation home on Maui, a beach hut in Nova Scotia and a number of principle and vacation houses in southern British Columbia. Even though these projects are in new locations and many have different purposes from the projects we worked on initially, there is a familiarity that allows us to pick up where we left off.

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Inform Interiors Installation, Vancouver, Photo by Ema Peter.
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Inform Interiors Installation, Vancouver, Photo by Ema Peter.
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VanDusen House, Vancouver, photo by Ema Peter.